RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Rajasthan Board RBSE Class 6 Social Science Solutions Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

RBSE Class 6 Social Science Ancient Indian Economy Intext Questions and Answers

Activity:

Page No 142.

Question 1.
Discuss why India was called a ‘Bird of Gold’?
Answer:
India – a ‘Bird of Gold’ Ancient India was called a Golden Bird or a Bird of Gold. In ancient India, trade and industries were at their highest. Products of India were in great demand due to their superior quality. As such a large quantity of our products was exported. Gold , and silver were received in payments against the goods exported.

Due to the availability of good quality products in India itself, we were not required to import from other countries. Thus gold and silver received as payments were retained in India. Gold from all over the world got accumulated in India and our stock of gold increased and India became prosperous. That is why, India was called a ‘Bird of Gold’.’

Activity:

Page No 143.

Question 1.
Prepare a list of agriculture produce of ancient India.
Answer:
Following is the list of agriculture produce of ancient India –

Question 2.
“Indian farmer is better than an average English farmer in certain matters”. Who told this?
Answer:
Dr. Voileker told in 1889 that “Indian former is better than an average English farmer in certain matters”.

Activity:

Question 1.
Which were the places where the muslin cloth was manufactured?
Answer:
Dhaka (Bengal), Lahore, Sarhind, Patna, Calcutta, Madras, Silong.

Question 2.
Which were the places where the check and striped cloth was manufactured?
Answer:
Lahore, Sarhind, Calcutta, Ahmedabad, Buhranpur, Madras, Pondicherj.

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Question 3.
Which were the places where the printed cloth was manufactured?
Answer:
Samana, Patna, Dhaka, Pattan, Buhranpur, Madras etc.

Question 4.
Which were the places where the silk was produced?
Answer:

  • Dhaka
  • Benaras
  • Ahmedabad
  • Pattan.

Activity:

Page No 144.

Question 1.
Discuss, why India imported less during ancient times?
Answer:
In the ancient time, India imported less from the foreign countries. The countries of the Middle East were backward industrially and India had vast industrial resources, hence India did not import anything from them.

Page No 145.

Question 1.
What are Northern and Southern routes?
Answer:
There were two types of trade routes in India in an ancient times –

  • Northern routes and
  • Southern routes. Northern routes connected places in North India and Southern routes connected places in South India.

Question 2.
Differentiate between domestic and international trade.
Answer:
Under the domestic category, trading is done within the country where as in international category trading is done between two countries.

Question 3.
Which route was used to reach Bulkh in Asia?
Answer:
Crossing Kabul in Afghanistan, the northern- route went to Bulkh in Asia.

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Activity:

Page No 146.

Question 1.
Prepare a list of commodities of India which were in demand in other countries.
Answer:

  • Muslin
  • Printed and embroidered clothes
  • Iron and Steel goods
  • Tobacco
  • Silk and Silk clothes
  • Spices
  • Copper
  • Cotton and thin clothes
  • Zinc
  • Diamonds and Jewellery
  • Sandalwood
  • Teakwood.

RBSE Class 6 Social Science Ancient Indian Economy Text Book Questions and Answers

Question 1.
Who gave the following statements?

  • Ah Indian farmer is as good as an English farmer and in certain matters he is better than the English farmer.
  • When uncivilized people lived in western Europe, India was famous for the ruler’s opulent life-style and superior craftsmanship of their people.
  • Gold is flowing out of Roman Empire due to the excessive use of Indian goods.

Answer:

  • Dr. Voilekar (1889 A.D.) told this statement.
  • This was the report of Industries Commission (1816).
  • An author named Plini told this statement.

Question 2.
Fill in the blanks:

  1. A lot of goods were exported from India and ………………………….. was received as payment.
  2. Cultivation of. started in India, centuries before it …………………………. started in England.
  3. India was far ahead as compared Europe in the art of making ……………………………
  4. Iron casting furnaces of Moryan Era have been found in ……………………….
  5. ……………………. were received in India from Europe.

Answer:

  1. gold
  2. wheat
  3. ship
  4. Ishwal (Udaipur)
  5. Ivory and gold.

Question 3.
Name the goods and articles exported from India during the ancient times.
Answer:
Following goods and articles were exported from India during the ancient times –

  • Muslin
  • Printed and embroidered clothes,
  • Iron and steel goods
  • Tobacco
  • Silk and silk clothes
  • Spices
  • Wood
  • Copper
  • Zinc
  • Diamond
  • Jewellery
  • Sandalwood
  • Teakwood.

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Question 4.
What do you mean- by domestit and international trade? With which countries did India have trade links during the ancient times?
Answer:
Domestic Trade – Under the domestic category trading is done within the country. International Trade – Under the international category trading is done between two countries. Trade Links of India with the Countries during the Ancient Times –
India had major trade links with Babylone, Egypt, Jawa, Sumatra and Rome etc.

  • Ivory and gold were received from Ethiopia.
  • In the third century B,C. when the Roman empire started weakening traders from India increased their trade with east Asian countries.
  • The Armenian and the Parsian traders used the route through the Punjab, Afghanistan, East Parsia and Central Asia for trading.
  • India was connected to the countries of the middle east and the southern sea through the seaport at Surat in Gujrat.
  • Ports at Machalipatnam and Coromandal coast and Hoogli in the Bay of Bengal, connected India to South Asian countries. .

Question 5.
What do you mean by the northern and southern routes? Which places were covered through the Northern route?
Answer:
There were two types of trade routes in India in ancient times –

  1. Northern route
  2. Southern route.

Mahabharat, Buddhist and Jain literature have mentioned about these routes:
1. Northern Route –
Northern route connected places in North India and Southern route connected places in South India. Starting from Tamralipty (In Bengal), the northern route passed through Patliputra, Vaishali, Kushinagar, Shravasti to Hastinapur in present Uttar Pradesh. From there, it passed through the Punjab, Delhi to Himalayan foot hills, touching Kashmir valley went through Taxila, Pushkalawati (Present Peshawar in Pakistan) to Afghanistan, crossing Kabul in Afghanistan it went to Bulkh in Asia are more route from the Punjab led to Sindhu.

2. Southern Route –
In ancient times, the southern area beyond the Vindhyachal ranges was known as Southern route. Thus it was the name of a route and an area.

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Question 6.
Which are the routes covered in the Southern route?
Answer:
Southern Route The southern route passed in two directions. One direction went from Paithan situated on the banks of the Godavari in Maharashtra to the places in Bihar. The second direction passed through western sea coast from Paithan to Maheshwar on the banks of the Narmada and Ujjain in Madhya Pradesh,

then crossing Gonandha (Land of Gonds), it went to Bhilsa, Kosam, Saket (Ayodhya), Shraswati, Setanya, Kapilvastu, Pawapuri, Bhoongara, Vaishali and Rajgrih. The southern route passed through many mountain ranges. The traders had made many caves in the mountains for staying during the journey. Both land and river routes were used for trade. The traders carried goods from Champa and Mithila through boats to Tamralipti.

RBSE Class 6 Social Science Ancient Indian Economy Important Questions and Answers

Objective Type Questions:

Question 1.
Which crop was cultivated on large scale in ancient India?
(a) rice
(b) wheat
(c) tea
(d) cotton
Answer:
(d) cotton

Question 2.
Till the nineteenth century in which industry was India ahead of England?
(a) building of railways
(b) building of houses
(c) building of ships
(d) building of bridge
Answer:
(c) building of ships

Question 3.
Which were in demand all over the world?
(a) cotton
(b) muslin sarees of Dhaka
(c) woollen cloth
(d) jewellery
Answer:
(b) muslin sarees of Dhaka

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Question 4.
Which province of India was the main centre of cotton and silk?
(a) Uttar Pradesh
(b) Punjab
(c) Bihar
(d) Bengal
Answer:
(d) Bengal

Question 5.
Which industry was very much developed in India in the 19th century?
(a) Diamond
(b) Utensils
(c) Iron
(d) Silver
Answer:
(c) Iron

Fill in the blanks:

  1. Agriculture was at an …………………………. stage in ancient India.
  2. …………………………cultivated wheat centuries earlier than the farmers of England and Europe.
  3. ………………………… was famous for its quality and fine craftsmanship on the world.
  4. Indian traders received …………………………. in payment for the good exported.
  5. ………………………… imported cloth from India.

Answer:

  1. advanced
  2. Indian formers
  3. Indian cloth
  4. gold and silver
  5. Egypt.

Compare Column ‘A’ with Column ‘B’:
Question 1.

Column ‘A’ Column ‘B’
1. Ishwal Iron pillar, Mehrauli
2. Mehrauli (Delhi) Furnaces of Moryan Dynasty
3. Srilanka Lack of trade with India
4. Rome Good trade with India
5. Bengal Cotton and silk industries

Answer:

Column ‘A’ Column ‘B’
1. Ishwal Furnaces of Moryan Dynasty
2. Mehrauli (Delhi) Iron pillar, Mehrauli
3. Srilanka Lack of trade with India
4. Rome Good trade with India
5. Bengal Cotton and silk industries

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Very Short Answer Type Questions:

Question 1.
Which crops were cultivated on large scale in India?
Answer:
Sugar, salt, tea, opium, cotton, spices, silk and sugarcane were cultivated on large scale in India.

Question 2.
Which two types of industries existed in India before the arrival of the English people to India?
Answer:
Before the arrival of the English people to India two types of industries existed in India –

  • cottage industries in village
  • large industries in cities.

Question 3.
In which industry, was India far ahead of European countries?
Answer:
India was far ahead of European countries in the art of ship building.

Question 4.
Which cloths of India were in demand all over the world?
Answer:
Thin doth made of cotton and silk and specially the muslin sarees of Dhaka, were in demand all over die world.

Question 5.
Which were the main centres of cotton industries?
Answer:
Bengal, Ahemdabad, Nagpur and Mathura were the main centres of cotton industries.

Question 6.
Which were the main industries of India?
Answer:
Cotton and silk industry, making of copperbrass and tin utensils, manufacturing of gold andsilver jewellery, made of precious stones, marble, ivory, artistic work in glass, iron industry etc. were the main industries of India.

Question 7.
With wlgph countries had India trade relations?
Answer:
India had good trade relations with Egypt, Greece, Rome, Middle-East countries, Babylone, Jawa, Sumatra etc.

Question 8.
“Indians have known the art of iron moulding since time immemorial”. Who said this statement?
Answer:
Wilson told the above statement.

Question 9.
Which was the main centre of cotton and silk cloth production?
Answer:
Bengal was the main centre of cotton and silk cloth production.

Question 10.
What does the iron pillar of Mehrauli indicate?
Answer:
Iron pillar of Mehrauli indicates that iron industry was very much developed in ancient India.

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Short Answer Type Questions:

Question 1.
Describe the condition of agriculture in ancient India.
Answer:
Condition of Agriculture in Ancient India Agriculture was the main occupation of the ancient Indians. According to the scholars, the world learnt agriculture from India. Indian farmers cultivated wheat centuries earlier than the farmers of England and Europe. The English people were surprised to see the progress of Indian agriculture.

The way of the Indian farmer tilted his field, sowed the seeds, cleared the crop of unnecessary weeds and harvested his crop could not be seen in any other country. This was the major reason that agriculture was at an advanced stage. Food for the people and raw materials for industries were available in plenty from agriculture. Sugar, salt, tea, opium, cotton, spices, silk were produced on large scale and demand for them always existed in other countries. Cotton and sugarcane were cultivated on large scale.

Question 2.
Describe the progress of industries in India.
Answer:
Progress of Industries in India In ancient India, industries were at a developed stage. It is a well-known fact that prior to the arrival of the English people to India, Indian industries were more developed than European industries . At that time, two types of industries existed in India –

  • Cottage industries in villages and
  • Large industries in cities. The rural and cottage industries produced in a small scale and mainly catered to local demand.

While industries in cities, produced on a large scale and catered to the needs of large markets. India was far ahead of European countries in the art of ship building. Till the nineteenth century, India was ahead of England in this field. Major Industries – Following were the major industries of India –
1. Ship Building –
India was far ahead of European countries in the art of ship building, Till the nineteenth century, India was ahead of England in art of ship building.

2. Vessels –
Vessels made in India were not only superior in quality but had a better capacity to carry goods than these made in England.

3. Cloth Industry –
In 1750, India was a leading producer of cloth. Indian cloth was famous for its quality-and fine craftsmanship in the world. The cloth made of cotton and silk, specially the muslin sarees of Dhaka were in demand all over the world. Bengal was the main centre of cotton and silk cloth product outside Bengal. Ahmedabad, Nagpur and Mathura were the main centres of cotton industries.

4. Metal Industries –
Copper, brass and tin utensils were made all over the areas.

5. Gold and Silver Jewellery Industries and other Industries –
Manufacturing of gold and silver jewellery, the trade of precious stones, marbles, ivory and artistic work on glass, were other important industries of India.

6. Iron Industry –
Iron industry was very much developed in the 19th century. Wilson had said “Indians have known the art of iron moulding since times immemorial.” Iron pillar standing in the Kutab Minar in Mehrauli in 1500 years old and is a testimony to it.

Question 3.
“National and international trade was very prosperous of India before the arrival of the British in India.” Explain.
Answer:
National and International Trade of India National and international trade of India was very prosperous before the arrival of British in India. India has been trading with other countries since the year 2000 B.C. Egypt imported muslin cloth from India in ancient times. The Dhaka muslin was sold in Greece under the name of ‘Gangatika’.

Rome was also a big importer of Indian goods. Demand for silk cloth, embroidery work, precious stones and metallic goods always remained in the middle east. Since these countries were backward countries India did not import anything from them. Indian traders received gold and silver in payment for the goods exported and as such, the flow of gold into India increased. This was the main reason of prosperity of India. An author named Plini had made a complain that “Due to the use of Indian products in excess, gold is flowing out of the Roman Empire.”

RBSE Solutions for Class 6 Social Science Chapter 21 Ancient Indian Economy

Essay Type Questions:

Question 1.
Discuss the condition of international trade of India.
Answer:
Condition of International Trade of India
1. Export of Goods –
Muslin, printed and embroidered cloths, iron and steel goods, tobacco, silk and silk cloths and spices were exported from India. The Indian traders received gold and silver as payment for the goods exported.

2. Trade Links of India with Foreign Countries –
India had trade links with many foreign countries during the past centuries such as Babylone, Egypt, Jawa, Sumatra and Rome etc.
Wood from the forests of Central India was exported for ship building. Copper from Khetri mines in Rajasthan was exported. Zinc xVas exported from Mewar. Diamonds, jewellery and silk were exported to Rome. Pepper was in great demand in Europe. Sandalwood and teakwood from India was exported to cities located on the southern side of the Persian Bay.

Import –
Ivory and gold were imported from Ethiopia. Mainly horses were imported into India. In the third century B.C., when the Roman Empire started weakening, traders from India had increased their trade with Asian countries. Colonies of Indians started establishing in places like Suwamdeep and Kamboj. Traders from Kalinga had trade with East India.

Great Demand of Cotton and Silk Clothes from India –
During the past, cotton and silk cloths from India had a good reputation and demand in the world market and controlled a large market share. The Armenian and the Persian traders used the route through Punjab, Afghanistan, East Parsia and Central Asia for trading. Large bundles of silk and muslin cloth were carried on camels’ backs through deserts and mountain passes.

India was connected to the countries of the middle east and the eastern sea through the sea port at Surat in Gujrat. Ports at Machalipatnam and Coromandal coast and Hoogli in the Bay of Bengal connected India to South Asian countries. Both the routes were used for international trade. International Trade through Land Routes and Sea Routes – India’s international trade was done mainly through land routes and sea routes on the Indian ocean and the Arabian Sea. After the discovery of sea-route to India, many western countries started trade with India. The French, the Dutch and the British were the major companies.

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